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20130131
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: and for most of this hour conversation with the foreign minister of pakistan hina rabbani khar. >> i think pakistan today presents a country which is very clear notice head how it operate with its neighbors and that is to try and build on the trust and then build that trust enough to be able to build an environment in i we can take care of the disputes we have on the dialogue table rather than through military statements and through military actions. >> rose: the president's last press conference of his first term, and the foreign minister of pakistan when we continue. funding for charlie rose was provided by the following:. captioning sponsored by rose communications >> from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: tonight we begin with news from the white house, president obama held the last press conference of his first term this morning. most focus was on the battle over the nation's debt limit. the president warned in his opening are remarks that the failure to raise the debt sealing would threaten the u.s. economy. >> so we got to pay our bills. and republicans in
. a top taliban commander is killed in northwest pakistan. his violent movies are box office gold. we hear from quentin tar antino about his new film abnd nd signature style. welcome to our viewers on public television and around the globe. the five men accused of raping a university student for hours on a bus were charged and if convicted they may face the death penalty. the 23 year old woman died last week. it has sparked a debate in india. >> protests go on on the rape that has shocked india. lawyers set up to handle the case get their first trial. none are prepared to defend the five men charged with murdering and raping the student. >> it is heinous and in respect to the girl victim and as a message that we want to send to society, we want our society to be safe and such criminals will not get representation. >> no one is at home at the shack where the bus driver was living. the juvenile suspect al ledgedly caused the worst violence. the neighborhood under a cloud of shame. they say attitudes to women need to change. >> the problem sis with men, says this woman. and their bad intentio
to pakistan's foreign minister. according to one international ranking, pakistan ranks as the 34th most corrupt country in the world. it is not surprising that people are protesting. >> corruption that is a challenge in pakistan, like in many other countries. we are doing whatever we can and we intend to do more. we think that is very different than the type of person you are talking about, the person that has absolutely no credentials. staying for the last six years or more in canada. they are challenging pakistan and the fears of 180 million people. challenging the system or we have paid the price to put that in place in pakistan. >> you are talking about the clerics that have called on people to protest. but we talked to you about relations between washington and islamabad. one of the sticking points have been u.s. drone strikes within pakistan. there have been seven droned strikes within the past few weeks. have you come to the conclusion that these drones strikes are useful for pakistan? >> absolutely not. the point has been made for the last many years that they would be productiv
to resolve the fiscial clif. uni nazir was killed in pakistan -- he is one of the leaders accused of sending fighters into afghanistan but was seen as a friend in the pakistani state. for more on the use of drones, we have -- from the south asian council. how important a figure was this man? >> it is a huge, symbolic act. he has been replaced by someone else. the key message is the u.s. will follow and take out people crossing the border. if he was a friend to pakistan or if they were allowing him to operate because he wasn't attacking pakistan is a different matter. but his people along with similar groups were on the fringes, harboring elements that continue to attack the pakistani state. >> we have seen criticism of the u.s. drone policy -- would you expect more of that? a> in recent months there is heightened cooperation and visits from the head of inter- services and i believe they may well have understanding on the type of targeting that is permissable if the u.s. helps pakistan with the pakistani taliban, then perhaps the u.s. can get away with its own targeting list. >> this strike r
soon to tell, but this could be a long war. >> pakistan is no stranger to political turmoil, and today they were reunited after the supreme court ordered the arrest of the prime minister on charges of corruption. from islamabad, we report. >> morning in islamabad. the day began with chaos near parliament. police firing in the air, saying they were shot at first by anti- government protesters. they say this is a peaceful revolution, that the government must go. this rally is just one challenge facing pakistan's leaders. this afternoon, there was another. protesters were euphoric when news broke that the prime minister was to be arrested. the celebration has really begun here. the crowd has just heard the news that the supreme court has ordered the arrest of pakistan's prime minister. people believe the timing shows that things are moving their way. they believe it is a victory for them. protesters say this is just the beginning of the change. >> the whole system will be changed. tos is the first step, remove the prime minister. >> here is the prime minister of arriving at the supreme co
, thank you. >> brown: still to come on the "newshour": bombings in pakistan claim more than 100 lives; the new ability to pay mortgage lending rules; political uncertainty in venezuela and hollywood's take on the hunt for osama bin laden. but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: vice president biden will send his recommendations to curb gun violence to president obama by tuesday. the vice president held another round of meetings on the topic in washington today. this time, including sporting groups as well as the powerful national rifle association and others. mr. biden said a consensus is emerging for tightening background checks and banning high-capacity ammunition magazines. >> there's got to be some common ground here to not solve every problem but diminish the probability that what we've seen in these mass shootings will occur and diminish the probability that our children are at risk in their schools. >> sreenivasan: late today, the n.r.a. issued a statement saying it was disappointed that the discussions focused mainly on what it called an
": the targeting of pakistan aid workers; the value of seniors in the workforce and the "immigrant advantage." but first, the other news of the day. here's hari sreenivasan. >> sreenivasan: wall street started the year with a bang, as the fiscal cliff deal put an end to fears of sweeping tax hikes and spending cuts. the dow jones industrial average surged 308 points to close at 13,412-- its biggest gain in a year. the nasdaq rose more than 92 points to close at 3,112. the civil war in syria yielded grim new numbers today. the u.n. human rights office reported the number of dead has risen sharply over previous figures. we have a report narrated by alex thomson of "independent television news." some of the images may be disturbing. >> truly shocking. the words of the u.n. officials. syrians need no persuading of that. today, at least another 30 or so added to the death list. somebody fired into the petrol station. they'd have none here for four days. news was spreading fast that respliefs happening and the place was crowded. vulnerable human bodies... metal, concrete, fire, and high explosive.
much worse. >> those numbers keep rising. thank you. 7 charity workers were buried in pakistan today. they had been shot to death in a van on their way home from teaching girls and distributing vaccines. this is the latest in a string of attacks on people working in a polio vaccination scheme or educating girls. both activities are posed by the pakistani taliban. >> there has been no threats, no warnings of the barbarity that was to come here. this community center gave girls of the area and education and it is where parents brought their children for vaccinations. both are crimes in the eyes of the pakistani taliban who see them as serving a western agenda. the staff had just finished for the day and were heading home along this road when they were ambushed by militants. the 5 teachers were women in the early 20's and two health workers were traveling in this van. gunmen stopped them and camera decide and pulled open this door and then shot all 7 at close range. their handbags and notebooks are now bloodstained and is the line from the vehicle. 1 passenger did survive, a 4- year-old
think they should be deploying drones? >> we have used drones against al qaeda in pakistan, afghanistan, and other places in the world. i think it is incumbent on us in the senate to make sure we have a framework for when and how we're going to approve the use of drones. i do think they are an important tool in our toolkit to fight back against islamic extremists and to take action against folks who have demonstrated to be a real threat to the united states and our regional allies. >> thank you very much for joining us from capitol hill tonight. >> thank you. >> in other news now, senior officials say that leon panetta, the defense secretary, decided to lift a ban about women in combat. it will make available hundreds of thousands of jobs. women are part of the active military personnel in america. and a suicide bombing at a mosque at the capital of baghdad. explosives inside the mosque south of kirkuk. a funeral was taking place at the time of the attack. russia says it is not planning large-scale evacuation of its citizens from syria despite the crisis there. many were flown back to m
came. >> funding for this presentation -- hundreds came. >> to pakistan where police say more than 100 people have been killed in separate bombings in the country. the death toll has climbed and many more people have been injured. >> a bomb in the center that appears to have targeted soldiers. and then an attack at a religious gathering, 20 killed at this time. and in the evening, the bombing in an area where members share a muslim minority. journalists and onlookers have gathered at the site. and the building collapsed. scores of people, according to the police, have been killed. there are groups whose main aim is to target the shia muslims. hundreds have been killed. the authorities fail, and they find a way to end the bloodshed. >> reporting on a violent day in pakistan. barack obama announced he is nominating the white house chief of staff as america opposing new treasury secretary. saying he has his complete trust. he will replace timothy geithner that does not wish to serve a second term. the vice president continued his meetings on how to curb gun violence in america. he wants t
are going to have a fairly collective [inaudible] a garantor against pakistan interfering with the country and also the taliban not coming back. that is a real concern when july 2011 was the drawdown date. >> what can 8000 troops do to stop that happening? >> a good question. i would find it hard to believe that the u.s. government would not leave some number of troops. think about the blood and treasure that has gone into this. it is not just the united states. it is the u.s. and nato policy for continuation of a presence past 2014. is it a combat presence? no. it is a support to counter terrorism and a training program. the distinction between that and the combat provinces in the eye of the beholder. >> you have been following afghanistan for over a decade. your new book is "talibanistan." is that how you see the future of the country? >> luckily not. if you look at polling data, most afghans did not want the taliban. they want some negotiated settlement. it will have another election with a high turnout and they're all the things that have gone right. we know what has gone wrong. whethe
strikes in a number of countries including somalia, pakistan, afghanistan, and yemen. the inquiry will look at 25 separate from strikes including a u.s. attack in pakistan in 2011 where up to 40 civilians are reported to have been killed. in syria today, war planes continued to bomb rubble-held areas near the capital as president assad was shown on television and attending a mosque service to mark the birthday of the prophet. every day, thousands of refugees to flee the violence. the strain on those trying to shelter them is enormous. we have been to a camp in jordan. >> small figures and a vast crisis. every night now, they come in their thousands. most are women and children, terrorized by war. for the children, how frightening is it? >> they keep screaming. they cannot sleep. they cry all the time. >> in the distance and in the country behind them, smoke rises from an explosion. on this side of the border, they meet soldiers to try to help, not kill. >> at each border crossing, or forces are there to receive them. we take them somewhere south, to restore their sense of security
's fortunes rise again? >> the injury suffered by an activist in pakistan were so intense that a piece of her skull ended up in her abdomen. now, they will prepare to remove it and put it back in her skull. the doctors said she had made a remarkable recovery. >> her injury was life- threatening. a recovery so far is described as remarkable. weeks after malala yousafzai walked out of the hospital, they are preparing for her next major challenge. the government's bullet ripped a large chunk out of her skull. -- the attackers bullet ripped a large chunk out of her skull. now, they are preparing a titanium plate to repair the whole. >> this is a small defect. this is very adaptable. this is an easy battle to work with. >> malala yousafzai was attacked for defying a taliban edict. shot in the head at point-blank range as she traveled home from school. the taliban gunmen left her for dead but she emerged at the chaos of life. there was emergency surgery in pakistan and then the airlift to birmingham possible class medical facilities. her story has become a global news. a school girl turned into a n
organizations in pakistan's tribal areas who have argued from their perspective on the ground, civilian casualties are rather minimal. but other than some sporadic conversations i've had with people in the tribal areas, i think the data we have publicly is limited. >> brown: what does your data show, or people you talk to show? >> two things. one is tomorrow the united nations is going to announce it's appointing a special investigator into civilian deaths by drones, and through this targeted killing program. so we should be able to get some of the real facts through this u.n. investigation. it's ridiculous that the united states itself hasn't conducted this kind of investigation. of or disclose its results. but that investigation will be done by the u.n. the second thing is general mcchrystal just earlier this month talks of talked about the drone program and how-- how th the-- the attacks on civilians and the civilian casualties are cause, what he calls a vis viseral reaction of hatred in the affected countries, the very people we're trying to win over to our side. >> brown: that's be
pointed at rebels. political turmoil in pakistan deepened today, as the country's highest court called for the prime minister to be jailed. the decision came amid mass protests demanding that the entire government be dissolved. we have a report from jonathan rugman of independent television news. >> reporter: this afternoon thousands in islamabad celebrated their prime minister's downfall. after pakistan's supreme court ordered his arrest on charges of corruption. prime minister roger ashraf, no longer whiter than white and now facing arrest for allegedly taking millions from contract kickbacks. and this was the preacher breaking the news. dr. mohammed l. cadry a moderate sufi claire i can in a pin striped suit. his message of change is to dangerous to him that it comes from inside a bullet-proof metal box. >> this is peaceful revolution. this is democratic revolution. >> in order to... reporter: earlier armed police fired tear gas and light ammunition into the air to keep protestors back from the center of power. afterwards dr. cadry showed the spent cartridges from behind his bullet-
and also around the globe. it shocked the world, but remarkably, the pakistan girl targeted was discharged from a british hospital. her release comes three months after she was shot in the head. her crime was campaigning for girls to be educated. and jeremy has this report. >> a remarkable recovery, hard to believe as she walked out of a hospital. her survival was against the odds, the extent of her recovery delighted the medical staff. she says a thank-you to the nurses and doctors here. she is off to a temporary home that they have set up. something of a normal life after so much pain and separation. >> she could talk, it was a good side of her brain had not been damaged. ha >> going to school, the same right to education. her case has attracted worldwide coverage and support. >> the genuinely an inspiration for millions of other people around the world as well. the world did stand up. >> she was rushed to hospital and it became clear that the bullet wound needed a more sophisticated life-saving treatment. the teenager was brought to birmingham. with her family at her side, she has been
there are people who kill vacinators. >> recently in the middle of december in pakistan, those going out to do the vaccination campaign were attending some were killed if you want north of pakistan, some down in karachi, and that is horrific. it's hard to understand why that's happening. no one's claimed credit. we've gone a month now without much violence. we only have 250 cases last year in these three countries, and so the reason that we're doubling down, erasing a big budget, making sure everybody is committed to this because it's hard. once you get to zero, you dent you don't have to buy more polio vaccines. all those resources get freed up to work on the next big challenge. >> rose: there are three countries left, afghanistan, nigeria, pakistan. >> exactly. >> rose: and what's the percentage of polio casesem year now? >> the-- we had last year the lowest east was under 250. the majority were in nigeria, and the rest were in pakistan and afghanistan. so it's minuscule and away are really, really close on this one. >> rose: is 2018 the number? is that the date? >> we're committing we will
bin laden might be living in a compound in pakistan. >> the intelligence case was entirely circumstantial. nobody saw osama bin laden, had a full id on him. >> how could he live for many years inside a walled compound and never leave? why would osama bin laden want to be 35 miles from islamabad? why would he want to be steps away from pakistan's equivalent of west point? did any of this make sense? >> narrator: the president called together his national security team. >> he said to his national security team in the situation room, "i want everybody to tell me what your view is, what you would do, what your recommendation is." and he got a very mixed response. i think of the people in the room, it was probably 50%, roughly, were in favor of the raid option that we ended up taking. >> narrator: only the president could make the final decision on whether to send u.s. troops into pakistan. >> he also knew that if it had gone wrong, there would not only have been dramatically negative consequences for the men he sent in, and for our country's security, but also for his own polit
pursuing peace talks with the taliban. as part of that process, the karzai government has urged pakistan to release more taliban fighters. four were freed last week after more than two dozen were released in the past few months. whatever comes of the peace efforts, president karzai said again today, he plans to step down next year. >> certainly, i will be a retired president and very happily in retirement. >> woodruff: karzai has been dogged by charges of fraud since his re-election, part of larger concerns about corruption in his government. he acknowledged the concerns today, and said he hopes for a proper election to name his successor. >> brown: we pick up on today's meeting with two men with extensive experience in managing u.s.-afghan relations. said jawad was afghanistan's ambassador to washington from 2003 to 2010. before that, he was president karzai's chief of staff. and peter tomsen was a career diplomat who served as special envoy on afghanistan during the george h.w. bush administration. he's the author of "the wars of afghanistan." peter tomsen, let's start with you. what j
attitudes in pakistan. we had to convince the pakistani government and populous that a stable afghanistan not under a taliban rule was in their interest and that the nato istaff mission was achievable because it was one thing for the pakistanis to generally wish we would succeed but in the summer of 2009 they didn't believe we could or would and they were hedging their bets to avoid paying the price if we didn't. of course we had to affect the american populous. we had to show parents where their sons and daughters were in a very difficult war a long way away. the first thing we had to was change people's attitude and say this is a new ball game. we're going to do this more seriously. we are going to do this right. we are going to focus and we are going to take everybody's interests into account. we can succeed and we will succeed. >> rose: success would be defined as? >> an afghanistan that could defend it's own sovereignty. i did not think it was our mission to craft a perfect afghanistan. i thought it was our aspiration, our goal to create a strong enough afghan security force, stable
al qaeda organization which was one headed by osama bin laden and headquartered in pakistan probably matter a lot less now than a few years ago but what you have seen is that as we pit al qaeda in the core area in afghanistan and pakistan it splintered outward and moved outward. and now are you seeing, you know, like a virus trying to find a body in which it can find a weak host. it's moving out and becoming more powerful in places like yemen, somalia, libya, now mali. so it's moving further and further a field and there are so many weak states because this is where terrorists take root. they take root in failed states there are so many failed states in africa it is not just mali there are a lot of other places and now increasingly in north africa too because of the upheavals that we've seen in the last several years. there's very weak states that cannot resist the incursions of these islamist terrorist groups so we are actually seeing an al qaeda which is morphing and changing an remains very dangerous i think but the danger is taking different forms from what it was when it was mor
and the soviets. from the pakistan border to the atlantic ocean, you will have something like this, get ready for it and deal with it. >> are they the same ideologically as al qaeda in iraq? >> there are experts that can talk about that. by and large what they represent is extreme for the political islamic theological movements including using violence with anybody that disagree with them. that is what is in common for all of these organizations. calling them al qaeda is loose association. a few years earlier, they invited the city terrorists in iraq to join them as well. so you get these offshoots that are only loosely connected organizations. but they do have a similar theological and political agenda. >> how much of a threat do they represent to americans here? >> of algeria is an important energy exporter and an important country. this is a threat to of jury out. we see the expansion of rebels and these groups coming in, this is a potent threat and a huge area that needs to be dealt with. >> to syria where the bbc team has found evidence of a massacre that takes place on the edge of palms
countries like pakistan, meet with audiencees, take questions, be very visible. as secretary, she did not have a record of substantial negotiation-- a la henry kissinger, jim baker. it's hard to find things like that on in her record, but on representational side, very strong performance. also in terms of being loyal to president obama. the obama white house was concerned in the beginning, that this superstar, part of team clinton, was going to over-shadow the president and the white house. they were very controlling sometimes in how they methods foreign policy, but secretary clinton never stepped on anybody's toes. she always left it to the president to take the lead on things. so i think that was a sign that she was a team player. i find, charlie, more people from both parties today saying that they thought she did a good job, and that she showed that she has real depth. then you would have found four years ago. >> rose: clearly it enhanced her reputation. >> i think so. >> rose: when you look forward to the service of john kerry, assuming what most people believe the obvious confir
in washington on friday. mass protests were held in islamabad, pakistan, today demanding new election reforms. thousands of supporters of an outspoken muslim cleric gathered in the capital amid heavy security. they called for an end to government inefficiency and corruption. to the south, there were funerals for many of the 86 shiites killed in last week's bombings in quetta. thousands of shiites had refused to bury the dead until the provincial government was dismissed. syrian women now cite rape as a primary reason for fleeing their war-torn country. that's according to a new report by the international rescue committee. it says women report being sexually assaulted and raped, often in public and in front of family members. the i.r.c. gathered the data by interviewing more than 240 women in refugee camps in jordan and lebanon. the u.n. has registered more than 600,000 syrian refugees. in china, the people of beijing suffered through another day of severe smog, and for the first time government officials openly acknowledged the problem. the pollution was at its worst over the weekend, keepin
for the administration on several occasions. >> rose: syria, for example. >> pakistan, syria, other places. and i suspect that president obama is not going to see in senator john kerry as much of an independent operator as we saw with, say, secretary clinton who pressed very hard with bob gates for a much more muscular expansion of the surge in afghanistan. she pressed very hard for the libya intervention. and i'm -- it's not clear to me yet that secretary kerry, if he is confirmed, would necessarily press as hard as she did on those issues. he may well surprise us on that. >> rose: she has high public marks for what she did as secretary of state. among the foreign policy people, what do they look at as her principal accomplishment? >> i think that the public marks have been a little bit higher, charlie, than what you hear from within the foreign policy community. that's usually the case in these cases. certainly when she went around the world she was a star in her own right. she certainly stood for a number of women's rights issues that are near and dear to her heart. but it was interesting out of this
for islamist militants from pakistan. the assault killed more than 160 people, including six americans. headley could have gotten life in prison, but federal prosecutors in chicago asked for a more lenient sentence, citing his cooperation. the united nations opened a special investigation today into drone warfare. it will focus on civilian casualties resulting from strikes aimed at suspected terror cells. under president obama, the c.i.a. has stepped up drone attacks, especially in pakistan. britain and israel also use the unmanned aircraft. the u.n. report is due in october. in economic news, first-time claims for unemployment benefits hit a five-year low last week. if that trend continues, it could signal a better job market. and on wall street, the dow jones industrial average gained 46 points to close at 13,825. but the nasdaq fell 23 points to close at 3,130. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to gwen. >> ifill: president obama's nominee for secretary of state - - senator john kerry -- took the first step toward senate confirmation today. newshour congressional correspond
yousufzai was airlifted there after being shot in the head in october in pakistan's swat valley. today, the hospital in birmingham, england, released video and photographs of malala waving to the staff and hugging her nurses as she left on thursday. for now, she'll stay in britain with her family, and next month, she'll have skull reconstruction surgery. hundreds of thousands of palestinians rallied in gaza today in a rare show of support of the fatah movement there. the yellow flags of fatah were seen waving all over gaza in large squares, in processions, and from rooftops. it was the first such event since the rival group hamas seized power in gaza in 2007. hamas approved today's rally, and its prime minister voiced hopes for reconciling differences over how to deal with israel. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: the war in syria reached another grim milestone this week. the united nations estimated that the death toll from the almost two-year long conflict has reached more than 60,000. ray suarez has our report. >> suarez: a pro-government tv
in pakistan, i'm going to go after that target. you know, i want the cooperation of the pakistanies but we're going go after that target. that created a big stir. on another occasion. >> yes, and that was the yet civil, of course. but then the second one was when he said that he was willing to sit down with hostile leaders. and that he is side a strong country doesn't hesitate to talk. and that created quite a stir. this was during the campaign. >> yes, it actually started before hillary. i mean with all-- joe biden was one of the candidates. a number of other candidates. but you know, when you look back, it was clear that he had thought through these things because they helped, you know, they an nature-- animated some of the decisions that he made later. people asked me what is the most salient quality of barack obama. and there are many. but consistency is a great-- you know, you look back at the things that he has said over the years, and there aren't a lot of mysteries about the decisions that he made. he said he would end the war in iraq. he ended it. he said if he could go after bin
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 57 (some duplicates have been removed)